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Differences in sleep duration among four different population groups of older adults in South Africa

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dc.date.accessioned 2021-10-17T13:19:39Z
dc.date.available 2021-10-17T13:19:39Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05-10 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11910/10915
dc.description.abstract The study aims to investigate sleep duration in four different population groups in a national probability sample of older South Africans who participated in the Study of Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) Wave 1. A national population-based cross-sectional study with a sample of 3284 aged 50 years or older in South Africa was conducted in 2008. The questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics, health variables, and self-reported sleep duration. Results indicate that White Africans compared to other population groups had the lowest mean sleep duration (7.88 h among men and 7.46 h among women). The prevalence of short sleep (6 h or less) was the highest among both men and women among the White African (18.8% in men and 16.9% in women) and Indian or Asian African population groups (14.5% in men and 17.1% in women), and lowest among both men and women in the Black African (7.0% in men and 6.5% in women) and multi-ancestry population groups (15.6% in men and 12.7% in women). The prevalence of long sleep (9 h or more) was among both men and women the highest in the Black African population group (56.2% in men and 58.5% in women), and the lowest in the White African population group (36.4% in men and 24.3% in women). In a Poisson regression model, adjusted for sociodemographics and chronic disease status, coming from the male and female White African population group was associated with short sleep. In addition, coming from the Indian or Asian African population group was associated with short sleep. No population group differences were found regarding long sleep prevalence. White Africans reported more short sleep duration than the other population groups, while there were no racial or ethnic differences in long sleep. White Africans are more likely to have sleep durations that are associated with negative health outcomes. An explanation of the high short sleep prevalence among White Africans may be related to their racial or ethnic minority status in South Africa. en
dc.format.medium Print en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.subject SLEEP DURATION en
dc.subject SLEEP DURATION en
dc.subject ADULTS en
dc.title Differences in sleep duration among four different population groups of older adults in South Africa en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.ProjectNumber N/A en
dc.Volume 14(502) en
dc.BudgetYear 2017/18 en
dc.ResearchGroup HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB en
dc.SourceTitle International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health en
dc.ArchiveNumber 9776 en
dc.URL http://ktree.hsrc.ac.za/doc_read_all.php?docid=18337 en
dc.PageNumber Online en
dc.outputnumber 8667 en
dc.bibliographictitle Peltzer, K. (2017) Differences in sleep duration among four different population groups of older adults in South Africa. <i>International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health</i>. 14(502):Online. en
dc.publicationyear 2017 en
dc.contributor.author1 Peltzer, K. en


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